Monthly Review https://monthlyreview.org An Independent Socialist Magazine Tue, 21 Feb 2017 17:24:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 February 2017 (Volume 68, Number 9) https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/mr-068-09-2017-02_0/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:15:02 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86276

For those attuned to the most fashionable trends in mainstream discourse on climate change, it is clear that “resilience” is now in, and “sustainability” is out.… The concept of resilience, while adopted by some progressive thinkers and organizations, is nonetheless being rapidly incorporated into a survival-of-the-most-resilient philosophy in which poor nations, and indeed exploited and dispossessed people everywhere, are told they must simply become more “resilient” in order to survive—but in a world in which such dynamic adaptability is available mainly to the rich, who enjoy monopolies of capital, resources, and technology.… | more…

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Trump and Climate Catastrophe https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/trump-and-climate-catastrophe/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:14:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86277

It would be wrong…to see the new administration as simply a cabal of ignoramuses, beginning with the climate-change-denier-in-chief himself. Rather, their efforts to undermine even modest regulations and to discredit sound science are necessary parts of an attempt by carbon capital to proceed undeterred with burning of fossil fuels, as if this did not constitute a dire threat to the human species.… Today virulent anti-environmentalism, tied to a broader neo-fascist politics linked to white supremacy, is the backfire being ignited against both efforts to combat climate change and the larger movement for social and environmental justice.… | more…

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Dirge for my country https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/dirge-for-my-country/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:13:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86278

Marge Piercy is the author of many books of poetry, most recently Made in Detroit: Poems.… | more…

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Marx on Immigration https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/marx-on-immigration/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:12:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86279

Given the intense and often bitter debates over immigration now taking place in the United States and Europe…. [Marx’s thoughts on the subject have] received surprisingly little attention from the modern left.… [Marx wrote about immigrant workers] nearly 150 years ago, and he was certainly not infallible, but a great deal of his analysis sounds remarkably contemporary.… [And among his insights, largely ignored by economists and activists alike, is] the one Marx considered “most important of all”: the way immigration can be used to create “a working class divided into two hostile camps.”… | more…

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The Tyranny of Monopoly-Finance Capital https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/the-tyranny-of-monopoly-finance-capital/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:11:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86280

Since the 1980s, economic growth in the core capitalist countries has been driven by an enormous expansion of financial capital, accompanied by steady deindustrialization. In recent years, the monopoly power of this financial capital has displayed increasingly tyrannical characteristics: it depends for its continued growth on ever-increasing indebtedness and dependence in developing nations, widening the divide between rich and poor and ultimately fostering state violence that serves to suppress popular resistance.… [Today,] military and monetary strength work together to profit from inequality and instability in emerging economies.… | more…

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The Brazilian Crisis https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/the-brazilian-crisis/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:10:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86281

In discussing the Brazilian situation, it is easy to focus on the dramas of individual politicians and institutions. But to look only at this level of the crisis is to ignore the deeper economic conditions that have driven the country’s politics to the edge.… The deeper contradiction, however, lies with the natural-resource economy, in which government revenue and social spending require royalties that are controlled by a small, unaccountable elite…. The left’s only viable response…is to demand a radical restructuring of the primary sector and a reinvigorated opposition to neoliberalism.… | more…

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Ecology and Revolution https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/ecology-and-revolution/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:09:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86285

This article will be made available online on February 28th.

In the early 1970s, MR editors Harry Magdoff and Paul Sweezy increasingly introduced ecological themes into the magazine, and began to question the viability of unlimited, exponential economic growth in a limited biosphere. Sweezy, in particular, was deeply interested in ecological problems, a topic he began to write on in this period, in essays such as “Cars and Cities”…, and to which he returned on various occasions until the end of his life.… [In this 1974 letter to the influential ecological economist, Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen, Sweezy outlined] the revolutionary implications of ecology, and the break that these necessitated with pure “economism”—a rupture that only a truly revolutionary socialism could bring about.
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A People’s Theater on Skid Row https://monthlyreview.org/2017/02/01/a-peoples-theater-on-skid-row/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 05:08:00 +0000 https://monthlyreview.org/?p=86282

This article will be made available online on February 28th.

In Acting Like It Matters, James McEnteer gives a compassionate account of John Malpede—actor, activist, and co-creator of the political theatre troupe the Los Angeles Poverty Department (LAPD)—and of the Skid Row community that is the organization’s heart and soul. The story of Malpede and the LAPD is one of life as art and art as life, and its protagonists are the dehumanized homeless citizens of Los Angeles and their compatriots in cities across the United States and the world, who represent a growing part of today’s global working class pushed out of the formal economy.… | more…

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January 2017 (Volume 68, Number 8) https://monthlyreview.org/2017/01/01/mr-068-08-2017-01_0/ Sun, 01 Jan 2017 05:15:00 +0000 http://monthlyreview.org/?p=84188

Shortly after the election of Donald Trump, the alt-right organization Turning Point USA introduced its notorious Professor Watchlist…, listing some 200 radical academics in the universities as dangerous professors. Stories regarding this list were soon being carried in major papers throughout the country. In contrast to David Horowitz’s list of “the 101 most dangerous academics in America” a decade ago, the current Professor Watchlist has behind it the new sense of power on the extreme right provided by Trump’s electoral victory.… There can be no doubt that this is part of an attempted new McCarthyism. In terms of its overall orientation, the alt-right strategy here resembles the Gleichschaltung (“bringing into line”) in 1933–35 in Hitler’s Germany, where intimidation was directed at all the major cultural institutions, including universities, with the object of getting them to align with the new dominant views.… | more…

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Sovereignty and the State of Emergency https://monthlyreview.org/2017/01/01/sovereignty-and-the-state-of-emergency/ Sun, 01 Jan 2017 05:14:00 +0000 http://monthlyreview.org/?p=84189

Following the July 14, 2016, massacre in Nice, French President François Hollande once again extended for three months a state of emergency that was to have ended on July 26. An initial, twelve-day state of emergency had been declared after the Paris attacks and extended for three months by a law of November 2015. Still another three-month extension was added and came to an end on May 26, only to be extended for two additional months. Despite the obvious ineffectiveness of such a measure…it has been extended yet again, through January 2017.… This normalization of the “state of exception” has provoked only a muted public reaction. France has thus entered into a permanent state of emergency. This choice is not the result of exceptional events to which the country must respond, but rather expresses an intention to change the political system, as shown by the move to constitutionalize the state of emergency.… | more…

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‘I Grew Up with Extraordinary People’ https://monthlyreview.org/2017/01/01/i-grew-up-with-extraordinary-people/ Sun, 01 Jan 2017 05:13:00 +0000 http://monthlyreview.org/?p=84190

Aleida Guevara March is the daughter of Che Guevara and Aleida March. She is a pediatrician at William Soler Children’s Hospital in Havana, and teaches at the Escuela Latina-Americana de Medicina and at a primary school for children with disabilities. As a member of the Cuban Communist Party, she often participates in political debates across the globe. As a pediatrician, she has worked in Angola, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. She has two adult daughters and works closely with the Centro de Estudios Che Guevara, where her mother is the director.
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