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The Deepening Crisis of U.S. Capitalism (Economic History As It Happened, Vol. III)

The Deepening Crisis of U.S. Capitalism (Economic History As It Happened, Vol. III)

This is the third book of essays on the United States and the world economy produced by the fruitful collaboration of Monthly Review editors Paul M. Sweezy and Harry Magdoff. In these essays, written between 1977 and 1981, the authors assess the results of efforts taken to stabilize the economy after the epochal changes of the early 1970s, the end of capitalism’s “golden age,” by attempts to counteract the effects of inflation, debt dependence, speculation, and financial instability.… | more…

The Sugarmill: The Socio-Economic Complex of Sugar in Cuba 1760–1860

The Sugarmill: The Socio-Economic Complex of Sugar in Cuba 1760–1860

This extraordinary work deserves to be called monumental for its scrupulous and exhaustive analysis of the development of the sugar industry in Cuba, for the imposing originality of its approach, and for the unsentimental but no less passionate vision of history it embodies. The product of twenty years of historical research combined with ten years of economic and technical work in the industry, The Sugarmill is a landmark in post-revolutionary Cuban scholarship.… | more…

The Dynamics of U.S. Capitalism (Economic History As It Happened, Vol. I)

The Dynamics of U.S. Capitalism (Economic History As It Happened, Vol. I)

This is the first of the series of four collections of essays in which Paul M. Sweezy and Harry Magdoff, the editors of Monthly Review, chronicled, as it was taking place, the development of U.S. and global capitalism from the end of its “golden age” in the late 1960s to the full onset of the financial explosion of the early 1990s and after.… | more…

Latin America: Underdevelopment or Revolution

Latin America: Underdevelopment or Revolution

In his second book, Andre Gunder Frank expands on the theme presented in his influential study Capitalism and Underdevelopment in Latin America. It is the colonial structure of world capitalism, in his view, which produced and maintains the underdevelopment characteristic of Latin America and the rest of the Third World. This colonial structure penetrates everywhere in Latin America, forming and transforming all its features in obedience to its own imperatives and thereby imposing upon the region those characteristic features of poverty and backwardness which are not primarily the remnants of an ancient “feudal” past but the direct products of capitalism. This development of underdevelopment will persist, therefore, until the people of Latin America free themselves from world capitalism by means of revolution. The Cuban Revolution is thus viewed as the first effort in a continent-wide revolutionary process direct against both imperialism and the national bourgeoisie.… | more…