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“The militarized identity politics that was ‘whiteness’”: Marxism-Leninism Today on The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism

Gerald Horne introduces his book about 17th century English colonial aggression in the Caribbean and North America by mentioning a three-part ‘Apocalypse.’ He indicates that its ‘three horsemen’—slavery, capitalism, and white supremacy—were present and sowing grief at the formation of the United States. But the first two play only supporting roles in his narrative. They give rise to conflicts and crises that provoke white supremacy, his third protagonist, into existence…. | more…

Socialist Review considers Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism

This fascinating book builds on the work of Marxists such as John Bellamy Foster to argue that Karl Marx’s thought is central to understanding that humanity’s destruction of the planet is due to the capitalist mode of production. It is a further blow against the perception that Marx was a naive Promethean—someone who believed that simply increasing production will solve all humanity’s ills and that therefore Marxism has nothing to say about ecological crisis…. | more…

ResoluteReader reviews Gerald Horne’s The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism

In the introduction to his latest book historian Gerald Horne makes clear the consequences of European settlement in the Americas:
“Though disease spread by these interlopers is often trotted out to explain the spectacular downturn in the fortunes of indigenous Americans, genocide – in virtually every meaning of the term, including volitional acts by invading settlers – is the proximate cause of this towering mountain of cadavers. Thus, even when enslaved Africans chose suicide, which they were often forced to do, it would be follow to suggest that enslavers were guiltless….” | more…

Gerald Horne on the Centrality of Race, via WORT Community Radio

Allen Ruff, a host of A Public Affair on radio station WORT (89.9FM, Madison, WI), interviews the irrepressible African-American historian Gerald Horne, author of numerous titles exploring the centrality of race and class for understanding the contemporary world. His most recent book is The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism: The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, and Capitalism in Seventeenth-Century North America and the Caribbean | more…

Counterfire reviews A Redder Shade of Green

Ecosocialism is often seen as something of throwaway buzzword on the left, with some commenting that today’s left, which at least acknowledges that environmental concerns are essential part of the criticism of capitalism today, doesn’t even need it. Ian Angus, a writer of books such as Facing the Anthropocene and Too Many People? Population, Immigration and the Environmental Crisis (Haymarket Books 2011), with Simon Butler, and maintainer of the blog Climate and Capitalism, feels that it is a term that means much more than just a passing nod of one movement to another….  | more…

New! Samir Amin’s Modern Imperialism, Monopoly Finance Capital, and Marx’s Law of Value

Unlike such obvious forms of oppression as feudalism or slavery, capitalism has been able to survive through its genius for disguising corporate profit imperatives as opportunities for individual human equality and advancement. But it was the genius of Karl Marx, in his masterwork, Capital, to discover the converse law of surplus value: behind the illusion of the democratic, supply-and-demand marketplace, lies the workplace, where people trying to earn a living are required to work way beyond the time it takes to pay their wages…. | more…

How Short-Term Production & Profit Wrecks our Food System: a review of Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism

Billions of people around the world are drinking water contaminated with plastic…. We’ve been warned about the impact of capitalist production on natural processes for a long time. In the early 1960s, Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, insisted that the principal causes of ecological degradation, were ‘the gods of profit and production’ served by a cabal within industry, government and academia which betrayed the cause of scientific truth… | more…

Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism reviewed by the ISR

‘Ecosocialism needs Marx,’ Kohei Saito once wrote. In Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism, Saito shows why. Saito is associate professor of political economy at Osaka City University in Japan. In 2015, he earned a PhD in philosophy from Humboldt University in Berlin and spent time as a guest researcher at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities where he contributes to the editing of Marx’s natural science notebooks…. | more…

“The Wire and the World”: Helena Sheehan and Sheamus Sweeney via Jacobin

Helena Sheehan, author of the recent The Syriza Wave: Surging and Crashing with the Greek Left, and Seamus Sweeney, a “recovering academic,” who has written about the representation of Baltimore in the work of David Simon, recently collaborated on an article for Jacobin about how the decade-old TV series, The Wire, was a Marxist’s idea of what TV drama should be… | more…