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Science & Society reviews Kohei Saito’s “Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism”

Amid the rising tide of books on Marx and ecology, this book stands out. Much of this work has been about whether Marx’s analysis of capitalism was a blind commitment to industrial society that has ignored natural circumstances and ecological crisis. Kohei Saito brings Marx’s ecological notebooks into the debate, rediscovers Marx’s environmental concerns and their relevance to the critique of political economy, and reinforces the argument that Marx saw environmental crisis embedded in capitalism…. | more…

Revolutions Have Brought Disappointment–But Hope Remains: Stephanie Urdang on Southern Africa

When I immigrated to the United States from South Africa towards the end of the 1960’s I was totally unaware of the wars of liberation against Portuguese colonialism that had begun in the early 1960’s in the neighboring countries of Mozambique and Angola. All I knew about Mozambique was the reputation of its capital, Lourenço Marques, as a cosmopolitan Portuguese-style city where white South Africans went on holiday…. | more…

Why the working class counts: LA Progressive reviews Michael Yates’s new book

Radical economist Michael Yates grew up in a western Pennsylvania manufacturing town, later hard hit by de-industrialization. He spent more than three decades working as a college professor in his home state. Despite his career in academia and editorial role at Monthly Review, a seventy-year old project of socialist intellectuals, Yates never lost touch with the life experience of high school classmates, friends, neighbors, and relatives who toiled in blue collar jobs…. | more…

Facts, not Mythology: WBAI’s Building Bridges talks to the authors of “The Politics of Immigration”

On January 14, Mimi Rosenberg, host, with Ken Nash, of Building Bridges, NYC’s longest running labor & community affairs radio program, interviewed Jane Guskin and David L. Wilson, authors of The Politics of Immigration: Questions and Answers (2nd edition). What follows is a fascinating conversation of a “huge and complicated issue,” laden with illuminating facts… | more…

Horne’s documented proof: America can never be made “great again”–Against the Current reviews “The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism”

An apocalypse is ‘damage on an awesome or catastrophic scale,’ and Gerald Horne traces the transcontinental social devastation wrought in the 17th century both by the usual-suspect perpetrators—slave traders and owners—and by their unindicted co-conspirators, champions of mercantile and political freedoms in the British Isles and prerevolutionary American colonies… | more…