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The Persecution of Paul Robeson (Horne, on ‘The Chris Hedges Report’)

When you defy the imperial, capitalist American state, when you denounce the crimes done to its own people, especially the poor, immigrants, and African Americans, as well as the crimes it commits abroad, when you have a global audience in the tens of millions that admires and respects you for your courage and integrity, when you cannot be intimidated or bought off, then you are targeted for destruction…. | more…

Marxist Ecology after Marx (‘The Return of Nature’ reviewed in ‘Critical Sociology’)

In Foster’s own words, ‘what we must dethrone today is the idol of capital itself, the concentrated power of class-based avarice, which now imperils the ecology of the earth’. This reaffirms the importance of the fusion of red and green. In effect, this fusion is a revival of the historical tradition started more than a century ago by socialist materialists such as Marx, Engels, Lankester, and Morris to combine socialism and ecology… | more…

Abolition Democracy (Horne on Du Bois, in ‘The Nation’)

By the time his magnum opus, Black Reconstruction, was published in 1935, W.E.B. Du Bois was already a rara avis—a prominent Black activist-intellectual in the midst of Jim Crow. Dapper and diminutive, and nattily clad in suit and tie, he was renowned throughout the country. The first African American to earn a Harvard doctorate, Du Bois cofounded the NAACP in 1909 and thereafter helped organize a pan-African movement that bedeviled European colonizers. But what distinguished his close study of slavery and Reconstruction (and does so even today) was its Marxism. Du Bois had been exposed to Marx’s penetrating analytical framework in the early 1890s in

Foster on ‘The Marx Revival’

On Saturday, May 7th John Bellamy Foster will present on the ecology section of “The Marx Revival” (Cambridge University Press), alongside Marcelo Musto, who will present the Communism section of the book. The event is co-sponsored by the Marxist Education Project and Shelter and Solidarity. | more…

Antifascism on the “home front” (Horne and the Criterion Collection)

During the Red Scare, a telling phrase came to describe some who had been clamoring for more demonstrative anti-Hitler manifestations before the U.S. entered the war in late 1941: “premature antifascists.” Outside a narrow wartime period, antifascist convictions were now seen from a postwar vantage as suspect, evidence of Communist loyalty. Now forgotten is that there was an offshoot of this tendency: one whose adherents we might call “premature antiracists”…. | more…