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FORUM reviews Howard Ryan’s “Educational Justice: Teaching and Organizing Against the Corporate Juggernaut”

Preparation and militancy, though essential, don’t guarantee success. In Oklahoma and Kentucky, union leaders cut a poor settlement to end the dispute over the heads of those teachers who took action. Gains in one school, or in a city, or even across a state, can only be provisional absent wider changes in the political field. Hence the need for a vision of society which will consolidate and build from such gains, as Howard Ryan articulates… | more…

New! The Coming of the American Behemoth: The Origins of Fascism in the United States, 1920–1940

Most people in the United States have been trained to recognize fascism in movements such as Germany’s Third Reich or Italy’s National Fascist Party, where charismatic demagogues manipulate incensed, vengeful masses. We rarely think of fascism as linked to the essence of monopoly-finance capitalism, operating under the guise of American free enterprise. But, as Michael Joseph Roberto argues, this is exactly where fascism’s embryonic forms began gestating in the United States, during the so-called prosperous 1920s and the Great Depression of the following decade. This book is a necessity for anyone who fears America tipping ever closer, in this era of Trump, to full-blown fascism… | more…

How Slavery, Capitalism, and White Supremacy gave rise to the West: Counterfire reviews Gerald Horne’s The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism

In a recent appearance on Nick Ferrari’s LBS show, Jacob Rees-Mogg defended the UK’s colonial past, saying that it was ‘not wholly a bad thing’ with ‘bad bits’ and ‘good bits’ such as Britain’s role in ending the slave trade which he describes as ‘really wonderful’. He has this Great White Man view of history, talking of noble ‘heroes’ such as General Gordon at Khartoum, as well as ‘rogues’. It is this sort of history that Gerald Horne eviscerates in this scholarly, brutal and powerful book…. | more…

This Giving Tuesday, please remember Monthly Review

Tired of corporate-sponsored holiday consumerism?
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For almost 70 years now, Monthly Review has played a vital role in promoting a radical, socialist, anti-racist, and anti-imperialist vision that goes beyond social democracy to offer revolutionary perspectives needed in our time. We exist because of you, and a community that values our work. We have no deep pockets, no wealthy contributors—and definitely no corporate sponsors. We operate on a shoestring budget. So please help us continue our work in the coming year by making a donation today. | more…

“Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism” Wins Deutscher Memorial Prize 2018

Named for the historian Isaac Deutscher and his wife Tamara, this prize is awarded each year for a book demonstrating “the best and most innovative new writing in or about the Marxist tradition.” Previous prize winners include Mike Davis, Robin Blackburn, Ellen Mieksins Wood, Eric Hobsbawm, and Monthly Review Press authors Michael A. Lebowitz, Tamás Krausz, Lucio Colleti, and István Mészáros. | more…

Not “Can” but “MUST”: novelist Eve Ottenberg reviews Can the Working Class Change the World?

If the working class doesn’t save our vastly unequal and dying world, it’s difficult to see who will. Certainly not the billionaire class, which has the money to put the brakes on climate change by investing in renewables but has not yet seemed inclined to do so. They don’t seem particularly interested in eliminating inequality either. As for the better-off middle classes, they ‘are more likely to support fascism than profound social change,’ according to Michael Yates in his new book. So that leaves the working class…. | more…