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Political Economy

Essays on The Political Economy of Africa

Essays on The Political Economy of Africa

These essays, by two of the foremost scholars who worked in the Marxist tradition on African economic and social issues, offers an overview of socialism and economic development, and of nationalism and revolution in sub-Saharan Africa; of labor, peasantries, and populism. It includes case studies of Tanzania, Rhodesia, and Mozambique.

Giovanni Arrighi (1937-2009) taught in Europe, Africa, and the United States. He was a member of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union in 1966, and was deported from Rhodesia for his political activities. In 1979, Arrighi joined Immanuel Wallerstein and Terence Hopkins as a professor of sociology at the Fernand Braudel Center at Binghamton University.

The Iron Heel

Grand Theft Capital: The Increasing Exploitation and Robbery of the U.S. Working Class

The working class is being robbed, both through outright expropriation and the more hidden exploitation of countless workers who are struggling to make ends meet while capitalists pocket the surplus value they produce. Fred Magdoff and John Bellamy Foster dissect the neoliberal assault on the working class that is spurring a new generation of labor organizing. | more…

Woman using a mobile phone

The Telecom Industry in India: Free Market or Monopoly-Finance Capital?

The success of the telecommunications industry in India has been heralded as a “miracle.” But a miracle for whom? The answer, Rahul Varman writes, has clearly been the capitalist class, who, over three decades, have amassed tremendous wealth and power through the machinations of large firms, in collusion with the Indian government. | more…

The Dialectics of Dependency: Ruy Mauro Marini

Superexploitation and the Imperialist Drive of Capitalism: How Marini’s ‘Dialectics of Dependency’ Goes beyond Marx’s ‘Capital’

Andy Higginbottom analyzes the influence of Ruy Mauro Marini on dependency theory and the concept of superexploitation. Marini, he explains, carried Marx’s legacy forward—but there is still work to be done in the twenty-first century. | more…

Thousands of shipping containers at the terminal at Port Elizabeth, New Jersey (2004)

Limits to Supply Chain Resilience: A Monopoly Capital Critique

Capital, Ben Selwyn writes, has been advancing its interests under the guise of protecting “global supply chain resilience.” While those promoting the resilience agenda assert that these supply chains represent a net benefit, evidence suggests that they increase the transfer of surplus value from the Global North and, especially, in the. South. | more…