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Lifting The Shroud: Pandemic Capitalism & the Uprisings of 2020–Gerald Horne

Gerald Horne, radical pundit and prolific author, talks to Patrick Farnsworth, creator and host of Last Born in the Wilderness, examining “the material conditions that have precipitated the uprisings across the United States the past week, in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25th…. Dr. Horne frames the wave of uprisings across the nation within a deeper and broader context of previous uprisings (e.g. the Watts Riots of the 1960s in Los Angeles and the nation-wide uprisings that occurred after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.), and points to the impacts the ‘Long Sixteenth Century’ had in the formation of white supremacy, as explored in his book The Dawning of the Apocalypse…. | more…

Cal Winslow reflects on the Seattle General Strike of 1919

Cal Winslow, author of Radical Seattle: The General Strike of 1919, talks to Sasha Lilley, host of KPFA’s Against the Grain:
While the United States is in the throes of upheaval over police murders, we take a historical look back at another time of great social ferment: a century ago, when the workers of Seattle shut that city down. The first major general strike in the United States coincided with the last widespread pandemic — the Spanish influenza…. | more…

It’s About Time America Reckons With Its Racist Founding: Gerald Horne, via The Real News Network

Gerald Horne, radical historian and author of dozens of books including the forthcoming The Dawning of the Apocalypse: The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, Settler Colonialism, and Capitalism in the Long Sixteenth Century, talks to Jaisal Noor of The Real News Network about the eruption of demonstrations across the United States–and around the world–protesting the murder of George Floyd and countless people of color by police. Watch, below, or at The Real News | more…

General Strike 100 Years Ago Shows Us Hope for Today: Labor Notes reviews “Radical Seattle”

For five days in 1919, union members took control of the city of Seattle. They arguably ran it better, and certainly more justly, than it had ever been run before. ¶ The strike began when waitresses, laundry workers, streetcar workers, and more—65,000 union workers in all—walked off the job on February 6, 1919, to support striking shipyard workers. ¶ Thousands of workers volunteered to keep Seattle’s essential services operating. People were fed at 21 different locations; on February 9, volunteers served more than 30,000 meals…. | more…

Marx & Philosophy reviews Michael Heinrich’s “Karl Marx and the Birth of Modern Society”

Michael Heinrich opens the first volume of his biography on Marx and the modern society he grew up in by noting that ‘Marx probably would not have wanted a biography, and certainly not one planned for multiple volumes’. Seeing as Marx did not desire a personal biography, and that dozens already exist, Heinrich’s project raises the question: why write this book at all? While this review will diverge from the ubiquitous praise being offered elsewhere and offer some slightly critical commentary, it can confidently be said that Heinrich’s completed biographical series will easily eclipse previous Marx biographies… | more…

New! “Tell the Bosses We’re Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the Twenty-First Century”

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security… Never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet the very labor unions that could garner us protections and help us speak up for ourselves are growing weaker every day. In an age of rampant inequality, of increasing social protest and strikes—and when a majority of workers say they want to be union members—why does union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his book, Tell the Bosses We’re Coming | more…

How the Coronavirus Unmasked Capitalism: Gerald Horne Talks to WBAI’s “Building Bridges”

Historian and prolific author Gerald Horne–whose latest book The Dawning of the Apocalypse will be published in July–recently talked to Mimi Rosenberg and Ken Nash, hosts of WBAI’s Building Bridges, the longest running labor and community affairs radio program in the New York Metropolitan area, about the history of inequality behind the current horrific impact of the coronavirus…. | more…

Work is Inevitable But Its Organization Is Not: CounterPunch considers “How the World Works”

All human societies, from the most primitive to the most modern, have an important commonality—the need to work. Water, food, shelter and other basics of life don’t arrive as gifts. Work is required to secure them and to raise the next generation. ¶ So fundamental is this basic principal of human life that generations of Marxist theorists have based analyses of social societies and structures on the economic base of a given society…. | more…

A retrospective view of Ireland from the far Left: The Irish Catholic considers “Navigating the Zeitgeist”

Dr Helena Sheehan is a well-known left-wing intellectual. Her book, Marxism and the Philosophy of Science: Critical History, published in 1985, became a classic work on its subject. ¶ She has now written her autobiography, and this is the first volume, covering her life from the 1940s to the 1980s, a book which is full of interest for a particular view of Ireland and the world today…. | more…